Quality Time

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This morning started out as just a bit of quality time with my younger sister. We don’t get to spend a lot of time together as we both have busy lives. So it was decided that we would meet in town and grab some brunch at a local cafe.

After brunch and tea I asked if she wanted to come tub hunting with me to find a multi cache I had solved some months ago but never got out to claim.

Off we headed towards Higham near Gravesend and parked up. We began walking along a well used wooded footpath towards our final destination and were amazed to find a 60′ obelisk in the middle of the woods. It had a simple inscription on a metal plate which didn’t really tell us much.

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Well it was my sister who found the cache (and she’s not a Cacher) while I marvelled at the structure looming above us, explaining that “this right here is one of the many reasons I geocache!”

We were both intrigued and enthralled by our discovery that our day quickly turned into a history lesson. Now I don’t hold a lot of faith in Wikipedia but when you’re on the move it comes in quite handy. We discovered that Charles Larkin was a parliamentary reformist in the 1830’s and obviously a very prominent figure within Rochester.

Charles Larkin “promoted the Parliamentary reforms in 1832 that gave the vote to every householder whose property rental value was more than £10.”

This monument to him has been rebuilt three times since its erection in 1835 and was originally inscribed with The Friends of Freedom in Kent erected this Monument to the Memory of CHARLES LARKIN, In grateful testimony to his fearless and long Advocation of Civil and Religious Liberty And his zealous exertions in promoting the Ever Memorable Measure of Parliamentary Reform AD 1832

The last build was only in 1974, but already it is beginning to look a little worse for wear, I wonder how long it will remain standing or whether this will become another derelict part of our history.

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Categories: Geo Stories, Life goes on, UK History | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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